Posts Tagged ‘China’

CNIS Role in Chinese Standardization

Monday, August 16th, 2010

In this Talkstandards exclusive article Mr Wang Ping, Deputy Chief Engineer, Deputy Executive Governor of Science and Technology Committee, CNIS (China National Institute of Standardization) describes CNIS’ role in China’s standardization. Mr Wang Ping also exclusively outlines the current state of China’s standardization, article found here.

Affiliated with the General Administration of Quality Supervision and Inspection and Quarantine of the People’s Republic of China (AQSIQ), China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) is a non-profit national body engaging in standardization research. With a history of 46 years, CNIS provides important technical support to the country’s economical development and social progress.
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Summary of Open Forum: Standards Policy in China

Friday, June 25th, 2010

In June, Talkstandards.com hosted an open forum which discussed the standards system in the People’s Republic of China. A series of articles were posted by contributors which covered a range of issues related to China’s involvement and cooperation with standards setting in the EU, US and abroad.


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Standardisation Policy in China: A Path from Made-in-China to Innovated-in-China

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

This article is co-authored by Anne Layne-Farrar and Vanessa Yanhua Zhang (bio Here)

In the past decade, Chinese companies have aggressively invested in R&D as a path toward meaningful participation in domestic and international standard setting. These efforts are aligned with broader Chinese ambitions to transform the domestic industry structure from “made-in-China” to “innovated-in-China”. This transformation will leverage China’s influence in the global economy community via the nation’s intellectual property rights (IPR) and standardisation strategy, which is part of its overall industrial policy.


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Chinese Standardization and the benefits of European led coordination

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

In recent years China’s standardization system has matured considerably. Today, China has more standards than Europe, covering more aspects of economic operations than any industrialized country. China wants to be recognized as a major player in standardization, including export of its standardization deliverables. One of the growing ambitions of this country is to become a leading high-technology country, making a transformation from the “factory of the world” to an innovation-based society and from standards-follower to standards-setter for the rest of the world. This target is evident also in the 11th Five year plan for 2006-2011, where standardization is mentioned many times as a tool to leapfrog innovation, with specific emphasis put on the high-tech and ICT sectors.


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China’s approach to “standardization of the behavior of incorporating patents into standards”

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

In June 2008, the China State Council officially promulgated the “Outline of National Intellectual Property Strategy.” The Outline identified “the development and improvement of the standard-related policies, standardization of the behavior of incorporating patents into standards” as a special task. In November 2009, the Standards Administration of China (SAC) issued for public comments the “Regulations on the Administration of the Formulation and Revision of Patent-Involving National Standards (Interim).” The China National Institute of Standardization (CNIS) followed shortly thereafter in early 2010 releasing for comment the draft “Disposal Rules for the Inclusion of Patents in National Standards” . Together these documents reveal the approach China is contemplating for meeting the mandate of the China State Council.


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Questions raised by Chinaʼs “indigenous innovation” program: An Overview

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

Chinaʼs interest in developing and implementing a national standards strategy continues to attract widespread international attention. The strategy has been incorporated into the web of policies in support of Chinaʼs ambitious 15 year Medium to Long-term Plan (MLP) for scientific and technological development intended to make China an “innovative society” by the year 2020. As such, the standard strategy can be viewed as an instrument of industrial policy, now widely referred to as Chinaʼs “indigenous innovation” program, the implementation of which is perceived by the companies and governments of the OECD world as a threat to international norms of standardization.


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Standards in a Post China World

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

Newsweek this week featured an interesting article titled: “the Post China World”.

On first impressions, it seems odd to be speaking of a “Post China World” – but upon reading, the article makes some interesting points.
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Upgrading China’s Standards system – the challenge of rising complexity

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

China has substantially improved its capacity to develop and implement a broad set of interoperability standards, security protocols, and product specifications as an enabling platform for the development of indigenous innovation. However, as rising complexity in technology, business organization, market structure and laws and regulations is reshaping the international standardization landscape, China’s government-centered standardization strategy is under pressure. While rising complexity creates new opportunities for learning and institutional innovations, it also increases the cost of standards development and its risks, especially for Chinese companies that seek to move beyond the status of fast-followers to become co-shapers of international standards.


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Participating in International Standards Setting Bodies is Better than “Going it Alone”

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

Through privatization and the transformation to capitalism, Chinese market conditions are evolving apace.  The IT industry has experienced substantial domestic growth and foreign investment.  Even so, the central government (and to some extent, provincial governments) still exercises command-and-control on industry to promote domestic producers on occasion. Indeed, the Chinese have used standards setting as a tool to impact trade and advance Chinese industry over foreign competitors in their vast potential market.

As is well known, China has tried to force domestic technologies, ‘indigenous innovation,’ into IT used in China, even imports. The goal clearly is to “level the playing field” for domestic producers. But such a standards strategy can result in competitive disadvantage for a country. Such a policy makes it difficult for a multinational corporation to build facilities in or outsource work to a country that adheres to standards that differ from globally accepted standards. Cloud computing needs will exacerbate these factors.


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China and the Global Standards System: Challenge and Opportunity

Thursday, June 24th, 2010

China is on track to become the world’s largest economy some time in the next few decades. This could not have happened without the development and widespread deployment of scores of standards that provide an infrastructure for international trade. The tightly integrated supply chains that now link Chinese firms to Western consumers rely on standards for containerized shipping, electronic order flow and payment, bar codes, and even management systems.


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