Posts Tagged ‘ICT standardization policy’

Standards as Crucial Element for the Implementation of the Single Market in Services

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

The extension of the European legislation, i.e. the New Approach, on the European standardisation system to extend it to services was overdue reflecting the crucial and – despite the economic crises – still increasing relevance of the service sector for the economic development of the European economy.

Due to the different modes of service trade, European standards for services do not only promote the traditional trade of services, but also the other forms like foreign direct investments in service companies. This removal of barriers will increase the competition in service markets. However, the full potential of service standards for the promotion of trade, competition and employment will only be exploited if a sufficient number of service standards are available.
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Summary: EU Standardization – From Formalism to Pragmatism?

Monday, February 28th, 2011

On wednesday February 23, Talkstandards.com held an online open forum to discuss a number of issues related to recent EU policy developments, building upon our December 22nd mini-event “European Interoperability Strategy“.  Two communications released late last year by the European Commission related to e-Government and standardization – the European Interoperability Framework version 2 and updated Guidelines for the assessment of horizontal cooperation agreements – were central to the discussion, particularly the inclusion of FRAND licensing within the EIF specification of a open standard.


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Standardization, Government Policy and the “Consumerization of IT”

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

The pragmatism with respect to standardization reflected in the EIS and EIFv2 will be an important attribute to these policies in the coming years as governments increasingly grapple with a trend that enterprise CIOs are currently working thru (and have a clear head start on). As I’ve participated in debates with various governments around the world on the need for standardization strategies to help the government as purchaser of technology achieve better interoperability in eGovernment systems, I’ve often seen conversations begin with an “inward” facing focus. The direction of the conversation is often related to aligning internal government systems with other internal government systems and ensuring that a coherent list of standards is in place to guide that internal alignment. I have often noted that this approach falls short in that it only considers half of the equation and, importantly, it leaves the citizen out in the dark. We have to ask, how do citizens plan to connect and communicate with their government?


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EIFv2 – From Objectives to Action

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

In what follows I try to respond to two forum questions posed by the convenor;

Question 1: From Objectives to Action: The EIFv2 and EIS provide normative guidance on what needs to be done to foster interoperability, particularly across the semantic and organizational layers.  But how can Member State governments meet these objectives in practice?

Question 2: The implications of Open Specifications; The EIF v2 sets out attributes of “open specification” as well as a comment which appears to give public administrations some discretion to reference specifications that do not meet these openness criteria “if open specifications do not exist or do not meet functional interoperability needs.”( Section 5.2.1)  How does this differ from the language in EIF v1 and what are the practical implications of this difference in language?


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Encouraging Openness and Innovation

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

This article is co-authored by James Bryce Clark, General Counsel, and Laurent Liscia, Executive Director, of OASIS

Professor Ganslandt and several previous TalkStandards Forums describe the steady rain of updated policy guidelines on interoperability, standards and competition law that have fallen from the European Commission sky, over the past year.  As the sky clears a bit, it is a good time to look out form under our umbrellas, start assessing the path ahead, and plot out our pathways around the puddles.  Likely there still will be more clouds and rain on the horizon.  But several major themes have emerged, and can be seen more clearly as the bruine politique clears up, or at least abates for a few months:
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European Codes and Guidelines for Standards Processes in a Bilateral and International Context

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

Consider that ‘EIFv2′ and ‘Guidelines for the Assessment of Horizontal Cooperation Agreements’ are codes and guidelines for types of standards processes that a government entity might find acceptable or reasonable for some purpose. In that respect these two share several common criteria.
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Indigenous Innovation Discussion

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

Dieter Ernst’s December 9th Article “Indigenous Innovation and Globalization – the Challenge for China’s Standardization Strategy” (see: www.talkstandards.com/indigenous-innovation-and-globalization) resulted in an incredibly in-depth and interesting discussion and continues to draw comment.

In an effort to ease the introduction of any interested parties who may have missed the original live discussion we have put the original article and resulting web discussion together in pdf form.

See here: www.talkstandards.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Talkstandards-Indigenous-Innovation-and-Globalization-20110103.pdf

If you do get a chance to take a look a the discussion, please add any comments you may have to the original article.

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Indigenous Innovation and Globalization – the Challenge for China’s Standardization Strategy

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

A downloadable version of this article and discussion can be found here:

www.talkstandards.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Talkstandards-Indigenous-Innovation-and-Globalization-20110103.pdf

Dieter Ernst

China’s 11th Five-Year Plan for Standardization defines standardization as an enabling platform for indigenous innovation. That commitment to use standards as a tool for economic development has virtually no parallel. It reflects a major transition in China’s development model from export-oriented industrialization to an upgrading-through-innovation strategy. It is this development aspect that distinguishes China’s standardization strategy from standardization strategies in the US, the EU and Japan.
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China should not make the same mistakes as Japan

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

Wikimedia Commons: user grm_wnrOn my way to Munich recently, I bought a copy of the Economist with the headline: Dangers of rising china. So, the geopolitical influence of China seems to be an apt topic for the forum, one which we have covered before.

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The Role of ICT Standards in the Smart Grid Industry

Thursday, November 18th, 2010

The essence of the Smart Grid is the integration of ICT with PST (power system technology) to modernize the electric grid. Therefore ICT standardization and Smart Grid standardization are inextricably intertwined.

From an ICT perspective, today’s grid is much like our IT systems were thirty years ago, consisting of islands of closed proprietary systems that could not talk to one another. Realizing the vision of the Smart Grid requires evolution to an interoperable multi-vendor system of systems based on open standards.
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